About Bir / Billing in Kangra, H.P

Bir (35 Km), is known all over the world as a best playground for paragliders and is a paradise for tourist who wish to take a safe tendem paradliging sport. Bir is also well known for its Buddhist monasteries and tibetian settlement, not forgetting the Tibetan culture and handicrafts. One of the best aero sport sites in the world. Billing is 14 Kms away from Bir. With the mountain ranges serving as an  amphitheatre. Bir-Billing offer great opportunities for high altitude and cross-country flying for a stretch that extends to 200 Kilometers. Surrounded by tea gardens and an amphitheater of low hills, is an ideal landing around for para-gliders. Bir has Buddhist Monasteries that are worth visiting. Fine Tibetan handi craft are also produced here. Palampur is 29 km and Baijnath is 13 km from Bir.

Billing, 14 km from Bir, which came in the news in 1984 when an international Hang Gliding rally was organized at Billing, a place 20 km from Palampur where some expert hang gliders of the world participated. They rated this place as one of best in the world. In the month of May / June a tented colony is set up by H.P. Tourism to facilitate Hang gliders. At this time all the roads lead to Billing. All along the bottom of the ridges runs a parallel road from Mandi to Dharamshala and beyond which assures easy recovery for pilots after landing. The most important feature of this region is its weather. On bad weather days one can still fly 20-30 kms and on good days 100 kms is not difficult. October & November are the ideal months for flying in autumn and March to May i.e spring is also flyable but conditions are very strong in spring with thermals of 6-12 mtrs/sec and cloudbase of 4000 to 6000 mtrs. Palampur is 29 km and Baijnath is 13 km from Bir.

Other nearby Destinations


Dharamshala is set against the backdrop of the dramatic Dhauladhar mountains, Dharamshala is perched on the high slopes in the upper reaches of Kangra Valley. The town is divided into two distinct and widely separated sections, Upper and Lower Dharamshala, which differ almost a thousand metres in height. The colorful temple and Gompas, which reflect the culture of Tibet, adds attraction for the visitor. The Kangra museum gives an overview of the rich past of the region and on the other hand there are institutes that have been established to preserve the Tibetan art, cultures and traditions.

Mcleodganj is one of the Famous hill Station in Himalayas, and This place also famous for His Holiness second home. The Budha temple is situated opposite the present abode of His Holiness The Dalai Lama and is well worth a visit and around it are situated Tibetan monastery and nunnery. The Tibetan institute of performing arts (TIPA) is just 1 km from Mcleodganj and preserves a number of musical, Dance and theatrical tradition of Tibet.


Dalhousie is a quiet town, with a sense of enchantment. This hill station spreads over five low-level hills at the western edge of the Dhauladhar range, just east of the Ravi River. The picturesque town is interspersed with the colonial-era buildings, low roofed stalls and hotels.

Khajjiar, 2000 metres, 22 km. from Dalhausie and 23 km. from Chamba. A little out of Dalhausie is a beautiful, charming retreat that makes an ideal day excursion or even an overnight visit. Far from any major town, this tranquil spot has a small lake in the centre, on which is a floating island. Fed by slim streams, this small lake rests in the centre of the large glade of Khajjiar. A temple dedicated to Khajjinag is also located there. Khajjiar is also called "Mini Switzerland". The lake remains full of water in all the seasons and requires no rain water for survival.


Shimla is the capital of Himachal Pradesh came into light when the British discovered it in 1819. Till then, it was a part of the Nepalese kingdom. In 1864 Shimla was declared as the summer capital of India. After Independence, Shimla became the capital of Punjab and was later named the capital of Himachal Pradesh. In 1903 a rail line was constructed between Kalka and Shimla.

Shimla has been blessed with all the natural bounties, one can think of. Dwelling on a panoramic location, the hilly town is surrounded by green pastures and snow-capped peaks. The spectacular cool hills accompanied by the structures made during the colonial era create an aura, which is very different from other hill stations.


Kullu was once known as Kulanthpitha, which means the end of the habitable world. Beyond rose the forbidding heights of the Greater Himalayas, and by the banks of the shining river Beas, lay the fabled 'Silver Valley'. The town of Kullu has long been a centre of faith. In the 17th century, Raja Jagat Singh installed here an idol of Lord Raghunathji, which he brought from Ayodhya. As a mark of his penance, he placed the idol on his throne and it became the presiding deity of the valley.

Manali literally means the 'Home of Manu'. Manu is the mythological character who is supposed to have survived when the world was drowned in Flood. He then came to Manali and recreated human life. Thus, the area of Manali is sacred and Hindus treat the temples over here as pilgrimage.